Modeling Thrombosis with Sacrificial Bioprinting

Wikis > Modeling Thrombosis with Sacrificial Bioprinting

Thrombosis constitutes a major reason for morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular diseases and its complications. An in vitro thrombosis model has been recently built by taking advantage of an optimized sacrificial bioprinting strategy [1]. Using a bioprinter (BioBot Beta), i, ii) a template and a wall is printed with 40% Pluronic F127 aqueous solution, followed by iii) complete drying of the Pluronic scaffold; iv) then the scaffold placed on a piece of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is filled with gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) prepolymer and UV-crosslinked; v, vi) finally the Pluronic scaffold is dissolved by immersing the construct in a cold water bath (Figure 1).

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Figure 1: [adapted from (1)] (A) Schematics and (B) Photographs showing the sacrificial bioprinting method using the Pluronic bioink.

This method gives improved robustness of the template during the hydrogel filling process, potentially allowing for the fabrication of complex and interconnected microchannels within hydrogel blocks. The microchannels may be further seeded with a confluent layer of endothelial cells within their interiors to render them biologically active. When infused with coagulated human blood, these endothelialized microchannels form biomimetic thrombosis models (Figure 2) that reproduce the physiology of thrombosis in vivo.

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Figure 2: (adapted from [1]) (A) Schematics and (B) Photographs showing the sacrificial bioprinting method using the Pluronic bioink.

Post By: Yu Shrike Zhang. Correspondence should be addressed to Yu Shrike Zhang (yszhang@research.bwh.harvard.edu). For information related with the BioBot 1, please contact info@biobots.io.

[1] Zhang, Y.S., et al., Bioprinted Thrombosis-on-a-Chip. Lab on a Chip, 2016. 16: p. 4097-4105.